Ireland

Country: Ireland
Passenger cars below 3.5t - urban roads: 50 km/h
Passenger cars below 3.5t - non-urban roads: 80/100 km/h
Passenger cars below 3.5t - expressways: 120 km/h
Passenger cars below 3.5t - motorways: 120 km/h
Vehicle registration plates: IRL
Maximum blood alcohol content - Standard drivers: 0.5 ‰
Maximum penalties on conviction for drink or drug driving is €5 000 and/or 6 months imprisonment.
Maximum blood alcohol content - Novice drivers: 0.2 ‰
Maximum penalties on conviction for drink or drug driving is €5 000 and/or 6 months imprisonment.
Maximum blood alcohol content - Professional drivers: 0.5 ‰
Maximum penalties on conviction for drink or drug driving is €5 000 and/or 6 months imprisonment.
Daytime running lights: Mandatory day time running light
All new cars must have daytime running lights (mandatory since 2011).

Seat belts

The use of seat belts and child restraint systems is MANDATORY

The use of seat belts is not compulsory for:

  • People who wear a disabled person's belt;
  • People whose doctor have certified that, on medical grounds, they should not wear a safety belt;
  • Driving instructors or driver testers during a lesson or a test;
  • Police (Gardaí) and members of the Defence Forces on duty;

The only exemptions to restraining a child in an appropriate child restraint are:

  • Children under 150cm or 36kgs travelling in a taxi.

Traffic lights

The sequence of traffic lights in Ireland is green, amber, red and green again.

Red light: "stop" - do not go beyond the stop line at the light or, if there is no stop line, beyond the light.

Green light: go on if the way is clear - take special care and give way to pedestrians who are crossing, if you turn left or right.

Green arrow (also known as the filter light): you may move on in the direction of the arrow, assuming it is safe and the way is clear, even if a red light is also showing. Always look out for emergency vehicles that may be responding to an incident using blue lights and sirens.

Amber light: do not go beyond the stop line or, if there is no stop line, beyond the light, unless you are so close to the line or the light that stopping would be dangerous.

Flashing amber light: you may proceed only if it is safe to do so and, if appropriate, yield to other traffic.

Flashing amber arrow: you may proceed in the direction of the arrow but only if it is safe to do so, and you must yield if other traffic is approaching.

Failure to obey traffic lights could result in 2 penalty points and a fine of up to €120, or 5 penalty points and a fine on conviction.

Safety helmet not mandatory

Bicycles Recommended but not mandatory

Safety helmet mandatory

Mopeds
It is compulsory for riders and pillion passengers to wear a safety helmet which must be properly secured. It is advisable to use dipped headlights at all times when driving. High-visibility clothing should be worn to increase visibility and to help other road users to clearly see riders and any pillion passengers.

Motorcycles with/without a sidecar
It is compulsory for riders and pillion passengers to wear a safety helmet which must be properly secured. It is advisable to use dipped headlights at all times when driving. High-visibility clothing should be worn to increase visibility and to help other road users to clearly see riders and any pillion passengers.

Light and heavy tricycles
These vehicles are classified as category B vehicles and the Road Safety Authority strongly recommends the use of safety helmets and other protective equipment by drivers.

Light and heavy quadricycles
These vehicles are classified as category B vehicles and the Road Safety Authority strongly recommends the use of safety helmets and other protective equipment by drivers.

Safety equipment for cars

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Bike safety equipment

Safety equipment for cyclists, e.g. helmets, reflective vests are not mandatory. However, their use is actively encouraged. Bicycles must have a bell, a white light to the front and a red light to the rear.

Winter tyres

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last modification: 2015-08-21 10:30:05

Last update: 12/8/2015
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